Ghana looks to plantations to create jobs – spyghana.com

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spyghana.com
Ghana looks to plantations to create jobs
spyghana.com
Alhaji Inusah Fuseini, Minister of Lands and Natural Resources, has announced plans by government to create many jobs through the establishment of plantations across the country.

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

No industry can claim the distinction of being totally eco-friendly and plantations, which it’s claimed shrink bio-diversity, have the advantage of reducing the carbon footprint. Ghana, in particular, has been here before the large state plantations of the Nkrumah era attesting, and if for nothing at all they exhibited a boundless capacity to absorb labour and provide livelihoods.

See on www.spyghana.com

FG backs plantations owners to stop importation of palm oil

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The Federal Government has indicated its preparedness to support Plantations Owners’ Forum of Nigeria (POFON), to stop further importation to save the nation’s palm oil industry from extinction. Speaking at the panel review …

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

Our grip on traditional institutions must be strenghtened- the pioneers of the palm oil trade had West Africa as the base of their operations and this spawned giant conglomerates, now South-East Asia is the focus of this trade and the originating region is a net importer, the ‘descendants’ coming back to organise their ‘sires’. To be competitive in a diminished traditional industry do we adopt the much-maligned practices of our inheritors, to wit, massive plantation development with processing units,which have ecological consequences? After all, oil palm is native to West Africa and can be regarded as its natural habitat- by plantations we are only giving it a helping hand.

See on sunnewsonline.com

Asia eyes food exports – Weekly Times Now

See on Scoop.itThe hub-and-spoke concept

Asia eyes food exports
Weekly Times Now
Mr Talbot said producers and small food businesses should look at implementing a “hub and spoke” model to provide the technology and knowledge to sell into overseas markets.

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

Taking the battle to the ‘enemy’- frontiers are elatic these days, so much so that a ‘spoke’ can radiate into ‘hubs’ sited at what would have been regarded as immeasurable distances away. Now dispersion is not a constraint and the food value chain has very interesting ramifications, destinations at ‘astronomical’ distances…

See on www.weeklytimesnow.com.au

Sudan seeks to boost wheat plantations to cut imports – Sudan Tribune

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Sudan Tribune Sudan seeks to boost wheat plantations to cut imports Sudan Tribune The deputy director of Sudan’s agricultural bank, Salah Hassan, said that wheat plantation project will kick off in the winter season adding that fertilizers and…

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

This is an approach that has been tried and did not work- it amounts to thinking inside the box. Why does the planner seek to impose an involuntary restraint on the producers, when the market for the commodity is dynamic, not respecting national boundaries? The farmers should have an export marketing outlet that keys into the global market, so that the mechanisms which determine flows would work to mop up all their output. The bane of this approach is that after the first few harvests, the local farmers are no longer competitive even on the domestic market and large-scale imports resume, whereas left connected to international markets, there would have been that peculiar somebody somewhere, who would have found a use for their production, when brought to his attention. The name of the game is "Leave Your Options Open"..

See on www.sudantribune.com

Midwest farmers extend operations to Africa – Minnesota Public Radio

See on Scoop.itThe hub-and-spoke concept

Midwest farmers extend operations to Africa Minnesota Public Radio The plan is to expand to two additional operations, another in Mozambique and one in neighboring Tanzania and establish a “hub and spoke” operation to encourage residents to start…

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

The basis of the investment- the private proprietor on his own acres- seeking to extend a helping hand to those who can feed five times their current population but at present import two-thirds of their food, chose the hub-and- spoke as the vehicle of investment. Yes, "the centre holding" is half the battle as this exporter of success has recognized…..

See on minnesota.publicradio.org

President Kikwete to open youth agricultural camp – IPPmedia

See on Scoop.itThe hub-and-spoke concept

President Kikwete to open youth agricultural camp
IPPmedia
RUBADA is rolling out this initiative by using a “Hub and Spoke” modal where a big local or foreign investor will be a “Hub” while small holder farmers will be “Spoke”.

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

Classical use of the ‘Colossus’ as a locomotive to the mutual benefit of all, conferring a species of economies-of-scale on the whole by bulk sourcing of inputs, combined releases of produce and co-ordinated production. Market penetration can be and is often assured….

See on www.ippmedia.com

Tricks to Desert Container Gardening: Expanded Edition

See on Scoop.itMaking the deserts productive

Plants use a lot of water in a desert environment. … Plant water use can be 25 to 40% higher in our hot, desert climate than in more moderate climates. … Most plant roots are not as tolerant to heat as aboveground parts.

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

The emphasis here’s on individual endeavour, even though ultimately aggregation should lead to significant change, nonetheless, the mass producer can join in with its vast resources, creating accelerated conquest of arid environments.

See on xtremehorticulture.blogspot.com

Can green investments boost reforestation?

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Leo Pröstler heads an investment fund that has set up a reforestation project in Costa Rica with tropical wood. He tells Global Ideas why the model makes good business sense as well as helps restore the environment.

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How does BaumInvest work?

Individuals or companies invest money for a 24-year time period, and we use those funds to purchase former pastures and coconut plantations in northern Costa Rica and reforest them. We plant teak, mahagony, roble coral, cebo, almendro and other indigenous tree species. When they mature, we sell their wood and return investors’ money with yield.

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What about the investors? Are they drawn in by the 6.3 percent return on their investment? Or because they believe in the cause? Isn’t there a bit of greenwashing for the soul going on here?

The investors place their money with us because they trust us. Almost all of them are driven to invest because of ecological or social motives. There are many who want to show their children that money can change things, but that it takes patience: This project will run for generations. My son Stefan is coordinating the reforestation projects in Costa Rica and has made that his goal for the next 30 years. He now has a son too who is growing up there.

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One more question on the return on investment: I get two percent interest on my bank account right now. I’d be pretty skeptical if you promised me six percent….

Well, there are plenty of other forest investment projects that promise a return of nine to twelve percent. These numbers are based on the estimated increase in wood prices, among other things. We had to provide the Federal Financial Supervisory Authority, or BaFin, with a very specific calculation for the coming 24 years. Other timber funds are unrealistic with their predictions of how wood prices will climb, forecasting six percent – but we stuck to just two percent. That might be unrealistic too, and in that case we’ll have to send our wood to Vietnam where it can be processed cheaply – even if I want to avoid that scenario. But maybe it’ll be different, maybe there will be legislation at some point prohibiting people from cutting down wild teak. Then we’d be in a unique position with our plantations.

All those uncertainties make the whole thing risky for investors but they are aware of that. All in all, though, you have to see that we have come a long, long way from when we first started out at BaumInvest planting monocultures. I’m not a specialist in forestry, and maybe that’s why it was easier for me to do things with our tree nurseries that other people called impossible. The same goes for the local farmers – in the beginning, they thought we were crazy and didn’t take us seriously. Now they say it rains more, thanks to the trees we planted.

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

An ecological planter, an enlightened ‘despot’, a philosopher ‘king’, call him what you will, he is the avant garde……..

See on www.dw.de

Savanna Plantations to nurse one million shea seedlings …

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Savanna Plantations, a Tamale-based plantations development organisation that is into cultivation of mangoes, shea nuts, neem, agro forestry and epiculture (bee keeping), is to nurse one million shea seedlings for onward …

Akilade Ayotunde‘s insight:

This amounts to bringing order to chaos. The Shea grows wild and the import of this is that, its domestication has begun… the oil-palm of the savanna…

See on www.ghanamma.com

Everywhere, not just in Africa, the smallholder experiences appalling difficulties in making his farm a paying concern, the average smallholder appears to be in competition with large firms and getting the worst of it, restoring profitability to smallholdings must be the concern of all.